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At long last, a CD full of the falsetto pop king's wonderful Columbia recordings - including all the singles and 15 previously unreleased masters. Lou Christie's four-octave range is one of the most exciting and readily identifiable sounds of 1960s pop. He scored international successes with 'The Gypsy Cried', 'Two Faces Have I' (both 1963), 'Lightnin' Strikes', 'Rhapsody In The Rain' (both 1966) and 'I'm Gonna Make You Mine' (1969), before cutting one of his most enduring songs, 'Beyond The Blue Horizon', in 1973. He would go on to release duets with Pia Zadora and Lesley Gore, record the beloved eco-concept album "Paint America Love", and even make one of the earliest rap records with 1981's 'Guardian Angels'. "Gypsy Bells" uncovers a rather confusing and largely buried chunk of the Christie catalogue. His co-manager Stan Polley engineered a switch from MGM to Columbia at the peak of his fame, less than a year after 'Lightnin' Strikes' had been a US #1, and such a monster hit that it had pushed two cash-ins from Christie's previous labels - Roulette/Co & Ce ('Outside The Gates Of Heaven') and Colpix ('Big Time') - into Billboard's Hot 100 in it's wake. No question, Lou Christie was hot at the start of 1967. It felt like Columbia couldn't really fail. They wisely kept on producer/arranger Charlie Calello - who, in 1967, was also working with the 4 Seasons, the Cyrkle and Laura Nyro - as he'd given 'Lightnin' Strikes' it's irresistible, dynamic energy. The label sat back and waited for more sparks to fly. The titles of Christie's Columbia singles alone spelled out a confidence in his unique vision: 'Back To The Days Of The Romans', 'Self Expression (The Kids On The Street Will Never Give In)', 'Shake Hands And Walk Away Cryin', 'Don't Stop Me (Jump Off The Edge Of Love)'. Commercially, though, the results of his time at Columbia would be a crushing disappointment: 'Shake Hands And Walk Away Cryin' had all the hallmarks of a Top 10 hit but struggled to #95 on Billboard; 'I Remember Gina' was a huge regional hit - a #1 on several Alabama radio stations - but this couldn't be translated into a national smash, and it didn't even reach the Hot 100.  If either had done better, then there would have been a Lou Christie album released in late 1967. There were more than enough songs recorded but a paltry six were released at the time: the eerie 'Don't Stop Me' was a rough blueprint for 1969's 'She Sold Me Magic' (which would become a major hit in Japan); 'Self Expression' was a perky plea for progress and equality; while 'Escape' ("in a glass of champagne!") had emerged as the flip to 'Shake Hands'. This track saw Christie in crooner mode though, as with all his work, there were layers within layers - like Scott Walker, his lounge cuts were no straight-ahead Jack Jones recordings.
At long last, a CD full of the falsetto pop king's wonderful Columbia recordings - including all the singles and 15 previously unreleased masters. Lou Christie's four-octave range is one of the most exciting and readily identifiable sounds of 1960s pop. He scored international successes with 'The Gypsy Cried', 'Two Faces Have I' (both 1963), 'Lightnin' Strikes', 'Rhapsody In The Rain' (both 1966) and 'I'm Gonna Make You Mine' (1969), before cutting one of his most enduring songs, 'Beyond The Blue Horizon', in 1973. He would go on to release duets with Pia Zadora and Lesley Gore, record the beloved eco-concept album "Paint America Love", and even make one of the earliest rap records with 1981's 'Guardian Angels'. "Gypsy Bells" uncovers a rather confusing and largely buried chunk of the Christie catalogue. His co-manager Stan Polley engineered a switch from MGM to Columbia at the peak of his fame, less than a year after 'Lightnin' Strikes' had been a US #1, and such a monster hit that it had pushed two cash-ins from Christie's previous labels - Roulette/Co & Ce ('Outside The Gates Of Heaven') and Colpix ('Big Time') - into Billboard's Hot 100 in it's wake. No question, Lou Christie was hot at the start of 1967. It felt like Columbia couldn't really fail. They wisely kept on producer/arranger Charlie Calello - who, in 1967, was also working with the 4 Seasons, the Cyrkle and Laura Nyro - as he'd given 'Lightnin' Strikes' it's irresistible, dynamic energy. The label sat back and waited for more sparks to fly. The titles of Christie's Columbia singles alone spelled out a confidence in his unique vision: 'Back To The Days Of The Romans', 'Self Expression (The Kids On The Street Will Never Give In)', 'Shake Hands And Walk Away Cryin', 'Don't Stop Me (Jump Off The Edge Of Love)'. Commercially, though, the results of his time at Columbia would be a crushing disappointment: 'Shake Hands And Walk Away Cryin' had all the hallmarks of a Top 10 hit but struggled to #95 on Billboard; 'I Remember Gina' was a huge regional hit - a #1 on several Alabama radio stations - but this couldn't be translated into a national smash, and it didn't even reach the Hot 100.  If either had done better, then there would have been a Lou Christie album released in late 1967. There were more than enough songs recorded but a paltry six were released at the time: the eerie 'Don't Stop Me' was a rough blueprint for 1969's 'She Sold Me Magic' (which would become a major hit in Japan); 'Self Expression' was a perky plea for progress and equality; while 'Escape' ("in a glass of champagne!") had emerged as the flip to 'Shake Hands'. This track saw Christie in crooner mode though, as with all his work, there were layers within layers - like Scott Walker, his lounge cuts were no straight-ahead Jack Jones recordings.
029667109222
Gypsy Bells: Columbia Recordings 1967
Artist: Christie, Lou
Format: CD
New: Available $15.99 $12.59 ON SALE
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Shake Hands and Walk Away Cryin'
2. Escape
3. Self Expression (The Kids on the Street Will Never Give in)
4. Back to the Days of the Romans
5. I Remember Gina
6. Don't Stop Me (Jump Off the Edge of Love)
7. The Greatest Show on Earth
8. Standing on My Promises
9. Blue Champagne
10. Yellow Lights Say
11. Paper and Paste
12. You've Changed
13. Meditation
14. How Many Days of Sadness
15. Tender Loving Care
16. Gypsy Bells
17. Rake Up the Leaves
18. Holding on for Dear Love
19. I Need Someone (The Painter)
20. Shake Hands and Walk Away Cryin'
21. Escape
22. Self Expression (The Kids on the Street Will Never Give in)
23. Back to the Days of the Romans
24. I Remember Gina

More Info:

At long last, a CD full of the falsetto pop king's wonderful Columbia recordings - including all the singles and 15 previously unreleased masters. Lou Christie's four-octave range is one of the most exciting and readily identifiable sounds of 1960s pop. He scored international successes with 'The Gypsy Cried', 'Two Faces Have I' (both 1963), 'Lightnin' Strikes', 'Rhapsody In The Rain' (both 1966) and 'I'm Gonna Make You Mine' (1969), before cutting one of his most enduring songs, 'Beyond The Blue Horizon', in 1973. He would go on to release duets with Pia Zadora and Lesley Gore, record the beloved eco-concept album "Paint America Love", and even make one of the earliest rap records with 1981's 'Guardian Angels'. "Gypsy Bells" uncovers a rather confusing and largely buried chunk of the Christie catalogue. His co-manager Stan Polley engineered a switch from MGM to Columbia at the peak of his fame, less than a year after 'Lightnin' Strikes' had been a US #1, and such a monster hit that it had pushed two cash-ins from Christie's previous labels - Roulette/Co & Ce ('Outside The Gates Of Heaven') and Colpix ('Big Time') - into Billboard's Hot 100 in it's wake. No question, Lou Christie was hot at the start of 1967. It felt like Columbia couldn't really fail. They wisely kept on producer/arranger Charlie Calello - who, in 1967, was also working with the 4 Seasons, the Cyrkle and Laura Nyro - as he'd given 'Lightnin' Strikes' it's irresistible, dynamic energy. The label sat back and waited for more sparks to fly. The titles of Christie's Columbia singles alone spelled out a confidence in his unique vision: 'Back To The Days Of The Romans', 'Self Expression (The Kids On The Street Will Never Give In)', 'Shake Hands And Walk Away Cryin', 'Don't Stop Me (Jump Off The Edge Of Love)'. Commercially, though, the results of his time at Columbia would be a crushing disappointment: 'Shake Hands And Walk Away Cryin' had all the hallmarks of a Top 10 hit but struggled to #95 on Billboard; 'I Remember Gina' was a huge regional hit - a #1 on several Alabama radio stations - but this couldn't be translated into a national smash, and it didn't even reach the Hot 100.  If either had done better, then there would have been a Lou Christie album released in late 1967. There were more than enough songs recorded but a paltry six were released at the time: the eerie 'Don't Stop Me' was a rough blueprint for 1969's 'She Sold Me Magic' (which would become a major hit in Japan); 'Self Expression' was a perky plea for progress and equality; while 'Escape' ("in a glass of champagne!") had emerged as the flip to 'Shake Hands'. This track saw Christie in crooner mode though, as with all his work, there were layers within layers - like Scott Walker, his lounge cuts were no straight-ahead Jack Jones recordings.
        
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